Friday, 29 December 2017

Full Metal Panic! Anime's 2nd Director's Cut Film Previewed in Video

The official website for the three-film director's cut anime project for the first season of the Full Metal Panic! television anime series began streaming a teaser video for the second film in the project on Thursday.
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The films are screening in Tokyo at the Kadokawa Cinema Shinjuku and the Tachikawa Cinema City theaters, and in Osaka at the Umeda Burg 7 theater. Each film will screen for one week.
The first film, subtitled "Boy Meets Girl," opened on November 25. The second film, subtitled "One Night Stand," will open on January 13. The third film, "Into the Blue," will open on January 20.
Full Metal Panic! centers around a mercenary group called Mithril on a parallel Earth in which the Cold War did not end in 1991.
The original Full Metal Panic! light novel series debuted in 1998, and Fujimi Shobo published the series' 12th and final novel in the main series in 2010. The novels have more than 11 million copies in print. Tokyopop published the first five volumes before the company shut down its North American branch in 2011.
Aside from the 2002 series, the novels also inspired the 12-episode Full Metal Panic? Fumoffu TV anime in 2003, and the 13-episode Full Metal Panic! The Second Raid TV anime series in 2005. Additionally, the light novels inspired the Full Metal Panic! The Second Raid video anime episode in 2006. GONZO animated the 2002 anime series, and Kyoto Animation animated the two sequel series and the video anime. A new television anime series titled Full Metal Panic! Invisible Victory by XEBEC will premiere in spring 2018.

Thursday, 28 December 2017


Twice Upon A Time averaged 378,000 viewers in the five major Australian capital cities. It was ABC TV's highest rating drama of the day and the nineteenth highest rating program of the day overall (The Ashes and Big Bash cricket, the Sydney to Hobart yacht race, news and current affairs programs taking 14 of the top 20 rating programs on Boxing Day). These ratings do not include regional or time-shifted viewers.

Wednesday, 27 December 2017

'Shaman King' Trademark Listed Under Kodansha (Update)

Japanese publisher Kodansha is now listed as the trademark owner for "Shaman King" in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Hiroyuki Takei's Shaman King manga was previously published by Shueisha.
The January issue of Kodansha's Shonen Magazine Edge featured a teaser silhouette along with the URL "" on the last color page of Takei's Nekogahara manga on December 16. The website currently redirects to Kodansha's main website, but it will open on January 1.
Shaman King began in Shueisha's Weekly Shonen Jump magazine in 1998. It abruptly ended in 2004, though a reprinting of the manga revealed a "true ending" in 2009. Takei drew a series of short stories titled Shaman King 0 in Shueisha's Jump X starting in November 2011, and published a sequel series titled Shaman King Flowers in the same magazine from 2012 to 2014.
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Takei began Nekogahara, his first manga with Kodansha, in the new Shonen Magazine Edge magazine in September 2015. The manga is ongoing.
Update: The Shonen Magazine Edge teaser silhouette is below:


Doctor Who: Twice Upon A Time had an Audience Appreciation or AI score of 81.

The Appreciation Index or AI is a measure of how much the audience enjoyed the programme. The score, out of a hundred, is compiled by a specially selected panel of around 5,000 people who go online and rate and comment on programmes.

The score is similiar to that received by last year's Christmas Special The Return of Doctor Mysterio which scored 82.

The highest score of the evening was shared by Call the Midwife on BBC One, Paul O'Grady: For the Love of Dogs at Christmas on ITV1 and Victoria on ITV1 all of which scored 88. The highest rated show of the day, Mrs Brown's Boys, had an AI of 83.


Press reaction to the final Twelfth Doctor story Twice Upon A Time is in and generally positive.

The Guardian found much to admire in the story "There’s so much that is good about the episode. Good jokes – mainly about the First Doctor’s embarrassing un-PC old-fashioned attitudes (“Aren’t all ladies made of glass, in a way?”). I like the second world war spoiler too. “Yes, but what do you mean, [world war] one?” asks the Captain, not understanding the unthinkable. I like Twelve’s “over to you Mary Berry” to One, just because he’s old, I think. Anyway, it’s funny."

The Mirror felt the episode delivered. "It's an emotional rollercoaster to watch and the minute's whizz by so fast, too fast. I felt the ticking clock in my living room was ticking a little louder, counting down to the moment we had to say goodbye to Capaldi's Doctor. I'm so glad that the Powers That Be decided to bring Pearl Mackie's Bill back to the show for one more outing. In an episode that can't really escape from a looming theme of death, Bill brings not only a sense of fun but also heart to the episode."

However, The Telegraph wasn't impressed. "Heavy on stagy dialogue and light on action, the narrative got mired in its own mythology, too busy making knowingly nerdy references to construct a coherent adventure. Ultimately, even the hero admitted there wasn’t a villain."

The Daily Mail found the episode wretchedly dull. "We had to endure an age of Capaldi wringing his hands and begging humanity to ‘be kind’. David Bradley reprised the First Doctor, originally portrayed by William Hartnell in the Sixties. His chief role was to make scandalising remarks about the importance of having a woman about the place to do the dusting, and to look horrified when Bill Potts (Pearl Mackie) hinted she was a lesbian."

Radio Times felt the story was lacking substance but praised the nostalgia inherent in the story. "I get a little surge of joy that on Christmas Day 2017 the BBC1 audience will glimpse clips from 1966’s The Tenth Planet of William Hartnell and Michael Craze, both long dead, and my very alive pal Anneke Wills. The lamentable recast versions of companions Ben and Polly are kept mercifully brief, but in a coup of televisual magic a monochrome Hartnell transmogrifies into Bradley in HD colour. The first Doctor rematerialises right before our eyes."

The Independent praised the two lead actors. "Peter Capaldi, as ever, turns out an incredible performance as the Twelfth Doctor. In fact, you wouldn’t expect anything less given that his entire run as the Time Lord has been nothing short of magnificent. Unfortunately, given that this is his Doctor’s finale, David Bradley steals the show as the First Doctor. "

Digital Spy felt the episode delivered where it needed to, also praising David Bradley's portrayal of the First Doctor. "His performance really is spot on – a little spiky, pompous, yet warm and humane. Bradley puts his own stamp on the first Doctor, while remaining enough like his predecessor William Hartnell to soothe the Whovian hardcore. You're left hungry for more – for a story where Bradley's first Doctor is more than a distraction from the main event."

Den of Geek felt the acting plaudits belonged to one of the guest stars. "I can’t overstate just what superb work Mark Gatiss does too, as The Captain. Even before the moving revelation as to who his character really is comes out (maybe it’s Christmas, that that gave me a very warm punch), Gatiss’ quiet, diligent, matter-of-fact performance was tinged with a melancholy edge. Appreciating he had to do some of the ‘what are you talking about’ dialogue to the Doctors, I thought he played it superbly. Polite, baffled, and quietly curious."

AV Club felt the episode was a fitting tribute to the Twelfth Doctor. "This is a thoughtful, funny, incredibly moving episode about kindness, bravery, and the way small choices can make a huge impact. It allows Moffat to reflect on Doctor Who as an entire 54-year series while also serving as a more specific tribute to the 12th Doctor. And it gives Peter Capaldi a beautiful final showcase that demonstrates just how much he’s grown into the role since his rather ominous beginnings back in season eight."

Some felt the regeneration was too drawn out inculding IndieWire "The tradition of the Doctor pushing back against his regeneration is a recent one, and it makes for a prolonged and unnecessary goodbye. Regenerations are at their best when we’re tricked into forgetting they’re coming, like Eccleston’s magnificent and premature departure in 2005’s “The Parting of the Ways.” So having David Tennant, then Matt Smith and now Capaldi each deliver a drawn-out Christmas special swan song feels like three wasted episodes."

iNews praised the writing of Steven Moffat's last story. "The sharply-written interplay between both Doctors, in fact – and later Bill – was one of the joys of this episode. “Atmospheric? (It’s like) a restaurant for the French,” sneered Bradley’s First, gazing around the Twelfth’s hugely modified control room. “I thought I’d become… younger,” the earlier incarnation mused, gazing worriedly at his older self."

Finally Inverse found the episode a fitting final appearance for the twelfth Doctor. "“Kind” is the defining word for the 12th Doctor. It’s what moves him at the Christmas Armistice in Ypres, and it’s part of his final advice to his next self. That the incarnation who began his existence so prickly and aloof would end it as the champion of kindness speaks to just how much this Doctor grew and developed over this three seasons."

The Doctor Who News review can be found on our reviews site.